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20120701
20120731
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WJZ (CBS) 22
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involved in helping to stop and solve screams. more cameras to fight more crimes. the baltimore city police department's camera system hast just expanded. this foundation is providing a $53,200 grant that will allow police to act as private and public security scam raws at businesses and eventually home to the discretion of the owner. right now, baltimore city police have access is to more than 550 cameras to help them keep a watch out to crime. >> if something kicks off and goes awry, we could look at ure database and say, okay, this crime happened there. they have a camera. wow. let's check it out. >> reporter: this has credibilitied more than 12 -- to more than 1200 arrests. last year, this fatal shooting was caught on camera -- this has contributed to more than 1200 arrests. last year, the fatal shooting was caught on camera. >> if the crime happens inside of the store. we have to find out do you have a camera? is it operational? we already have that with this. >> reporter: and once the scene of a flash mob robbery say having police on their store is extra security they would expect. >>
in baltimore county. five of them have been in baltimore city. many of the victims have had underlying heart problems. and it certainly underscores how dangerous this heat can be. >> reporter: the death toll keeps rising across maryland, during one of the longest stretches of temperatures above 95 degrees in state history. and those who have to work outside are doing their best to stay hydrated and safe. >> it can get pretty hectic. have to drink a lot of fluids. have to keep you balanced. >> it's very, very bad. but we work because i need money. i need to pay the bills. i need --ue know. -- you know. we need work. >> reporter: most of the deaths have been in baltimore city, men, over 65, with heart problems. but no one is immune from the danger. >> the longer this goes on, as people become sort of used to it, they may lose sight of the fact that it continues to be a real hazard. >> we want to avoid any deaths at all. and if people stay cool and hydrated, we can avoid those negative outcomes. >> he's the biggest problem. pavement gets really hot. i try to keep really short walks. >> reporter
as the medical examiner completes more autopsies. seven of those who died live in baltimore city, three in baltimore county, and most of them were elderly men. >> reporter: the heat wave is history. fueling storms that left hundreds of thousands without power. and killing a stunning 18 people in maryland. >> the humidity is up. but the temperature is down. >> reporter: way down. but before the record heat left, it buckled pavement, including part of u.s. 50. and buckled train tracks. it even left this u.s. airways jet stuck, sunk into soft pavement. >> pure hell. really. it has been awful. >> reporter: tell me about today. >> it's heaven. i love it. i love it. >> we can walk up to the snowball stand today. >> i turned off my air conditioner. save on that electric bill. >> reporter: but with the cool front came storms that knocked out another 15,000 bge customers. >> i heard that big bang. transformer blew. wire fell down. >> reporter: the utility restored most of them. bge has three weeks to issue a full report to the public service commission on the main outages last week. that commiss
decades on the baltimore city police force. but now an officer is forced to resign in disgrace. mary is in the newsroom with more on this case. >> reporter: the detective and her daughter both pleaded guilty today to theft. police sayanderson undercharged her mother. as she brought groceries at this food depot. a security officer spotted what was going on and alerted managers. today, early received probation judgment. early must serve three months probation. >>> anderson received six months supervised probation. air a woman who injected potentially deadly substances. wjz is live in federal court. mike hellgren with more on the sentence and reaction to it. mike? >> vic, she says she was just trying to feed her family and told the judge she accepted responsibility. in addition to those three years, she get a $25,000 fine, far less than the $2 fifty,000 fine the government wanted. can't say anything. >> she said she was just trying to get people to feel better about themselves. never realizing the danger. federal prosecutors say it was industrial grade. the kind used in paint and furnit
of his car, skidded out of control and died. police say speeding is to blame. >>> grading baltimore city schools. new numbers show a slight improvement in education. but there is still a long way to go. wjz is live. rochelle ritchie is at city school headquarters in east baltimore with the results. rochelle? >> reporter: well, denise, the results are mixed and show the challenges ahead. >> reporter: superintendent dr. andres alonzo reveals the results for the 2012 assessment test. the results not wad but -- not bad but not good. >> reporter: the numbers matter. and they matter tremendously. >> reporter: baltimore city school's numbers remain fairly dorm ant to last year. math scores in grades 3 through 8 are up two percentage points in 2011, where 62% of students scored a proficient or advanced. this year, an increase of just 63%. >> summer school last year was all about math. because we knew that math was the subject that we needed to make the progress. >> reporter: focusing solely on math. the scores for reading was decreased nearly 2% from 69% to just under 68%. >> for new entrants in
and achieve them. 30-year-old of baltimore city, a math teacher, was own of 10,000 submissions. her plan was to get the girls at her elementary school to run a mile. >> we would run monday. in the end, they were able to accomplish their goal of running a mile and it was awesome. >> reporter: for ten weeks, kaitlyn tracked her progress online, vying for the chance to be one of the new chases of under armour, as one of their inspirational women and it worked. you brought a whole new light and we're excited to have you. under armour said kaitlyn's submission stood out the entire time. it was her selflessness that made her shine. she wins an under armour deal for training and athletic gear for a year. >> they got along better in class. it was good for the overall kids. >> reporter: under armour said the entire campaign was such a success, they plan to launch a similar one this fall. in baltimore city, i'm jessica kartalija, wjz eyewitness news. >> the three inspirational women are from texas, tennessee, and missouri. good for all the girls who met their goals. >> a mile,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
-year veteran of the baltimore city fire department. he is now suspended without pay, pending an internal investigation. vic? >> mary, thank you. simmons was a firefighter with truck 25 out of rowland park. >> controversy continues out of plans to give fire chief james clack a contract extension and a pay raise. comes at a time when fire companies are being closed. >> derek valcourt explains, a vote on the measure was taken today, as more opponents speak out. derek? >> well, the mayor says the fire chief has earned that pay raise. but firefighters and some city residents say the fire chief is benefiting from their loss. >> reporter: the permanent closure of three city fire companies because of three budget constraints already had firefighters angry. which is why the mayor's request had firefighters union leaders saying no way. >> this [ inaudible ] i don't think chief complak or his command staff should take the raise. >> reporter: but in a 3-2 vote, the city board of estimates agrees to extend the contract for six years. the deal grants clack more than $28,000 worth of pay in
are being becoming the working poor. >> reporter: baltimore city hall, packed with people demanding raise in minimum wage. bruce gross recently lost his construction job. now he's raising his twin boys and daughter on $7.25 an hour. >> i can't even raise my kids or my family on that type of money. i have to go through months of deciding whether to pay bills or get food. >> reporter: current minimum wage is $7.25. part of rebuild america act, which calls for infrastucture to create new jobs. partially paid for by increasing taxes on the wealthiest americans. >> we're struggling to get to the middle. and i feel like they should be thinking, oh, how can we help? >> reporter: there's no question, middle class families are falling behind. their salaries have increased 35% in the last foury decade -- four decades, while the wealthiest has seen a 278% increase. >> it is absolutely destroying the very health of our democracy. >> cindy walsh is an activist. >> we will continue to see if if this if we do not put our foot down to the idea of free market and globalization being the answer to domestic
- related deaths. >> reporter: already, maryland has seen four deaths from the heat. two from baltimore city, one in montgomery county, another in wicomico county. doctors say those at risk have underlying health problems. >> they do worse with the heat. and they do worse with every day of the heat. you can see increasing problems and increasing deaths as the heat wave goes on. >> reporter: but it's so hot, even healthy adults are in trouble. >> i've gotten dizzy. so i decided to carry an umbrella today. because the heat just pounds on you. and it's excruciating. >> i got business, i take care of it in the morning. so when it's starting to get real hot, i'm heading towards home. >> i'm not young myself. so it's pretty hard on all of us. >> reporter: howard monet already opens his air- conditioned home to friends and family. and with power still out for tens of thousands, health officials are hoping others will do the same and keep the sun from taking lives. >> hospital emergency rooms also feeling the heat. many have noticed an uptick in the number of people over the age of 65, who are comin
there. also we just got off the phone with adrian barnes. she is with baltimore city's department of transportation. she is putting out an urgent transportation alert to people that are downtown baltimore right now. she is telling them if you're downtown in this general area it is best to try and stay downtown for the time being. they're trying to ease up some of this traffic gridlock that we've been seeing here from sky high chopper 13. if you do have to leave downtown, try using the south side or some of the tunnels to get out of downtown. if you have to leave downtown and go north, go north and try to avoid light streets. these water main breaks they have been a huge problem in baltimore over the last decade or so. there have been a number of them. there are some real amazing estimates of how much money it would cost to fix these problems. hundreds of millions of the dollars in baltimore alone to fix this infrastructure. until that funding comes through, we're going to see many of these. the water main is still broken. it is a 20-inch main. back to you. >> thank you. stay with
of which have been in baltimore city. and that danger is why doctors are telling people to stay out of the sun or find a cool place to cool off. >> reporter: another day under a vicious sun, as triple digit temperatures bear down on baltimore. >> the humidity has made it unbearable. doesn't matter if you're in the shade or in the sun. >> i'm sweating water now. i feel like a walking river right now. >> reporter: people sweating it out in the city. try to refuel. create their own shade, or simply ditch a few layers in an effort to stay cool. >> it's horrible. because it's so hot and sweaty. and it's just the noad -- not a good feeling. >> keeping cool with umbrella, water. >> reporter: but when it's this hot, the weather isn't just uncomfortable, it can also be dangerous. >> we definitely see a lot more people coming in who are dehydrated. they're not anticipating it. >> reporter: dr. michael witting works in the e.r.a. the -- e.r., the maryland medical center. he says people come in dehydrated, confused and weak. but it can get worse. >> the heat has been blamed for eight deaths in
are trying to fathom why anyone would kill him. and baltimore city police are on the lookout for the shooter. >> baltimore city police are investigating the shooting death of 23-year-old brandon sproal, a former basketball player at walbrook high school. monday night, around 10:30, brandon was hanging out on the corner of baker and mcking, with two other people, when he was robbed of his belongings and his life. >> when they were approached by two black males, one armed with a gun. >> police say sproal was ordered to his knees and then told to pus his hands behind his head. that's when he was shot. the other two victims got away. >> they found a victim suffering from a gunshot wound to the back of the head. >> reporter: brandon died on the scene. the news hitting his former basketball coach like a ton of bricks. >> breaks my heart completely. >> reporter: brandon and his older brother rodney played and led the team to two championships back in 2005 and 2006. bridgers describes brandon as a tenacious player with a quiet spirit. >> this kid has had a job since he was in high school. always ear
. >> reporter: watson's run from the law started in baltimore city. preliminary reports say officers tried to stop watson after he sideswiped a car and kept going. police followed him through downtown streets. watson hopped on 97 south towards anne arundel county. police called off their pursuit and alert anne arundel county police of the man coming their way. sky eye 13 stayed with watson as he drives erratically during rush hour on the highway, coming close to running some cars off the road. >> certainly a dangerous situation. not just in our county, but in other areas, putting police in jeopardy. >> reporter: watson eventually gets off on telegraph road, speeding through a residential neighborhood. he smashes into a gold sedan. the driver was left stunned. >> pretty crazy, but justice prevails, i guess. >> reporter: watson's history with the justice system includes charges for dui, assault, and drug possession. his rap sheet got much longer, after 11 traffic violations just yesterday. >> ranging from leaving the scene of an accident and related charges. >> reporter: the vehicle watson w
apart the asphalt. >> this is the nature of the aging infrastructure in many large cities. baltimore is not an exception. >> reporter: a water main break two weeks ago. and yesterday, a 20-feet deep, 2-feet wide, and 6 feet long sinkhole, opening into a storm drain built into the 1930s. >> right now, we are sending a crew in to do a walk-in inspection of the large storm drain under the street. >> reporter: sky eye chopper 13 over the scene, showing a gaping hole in the middle of the street. causing confusion amongst pedestrians navigating their way on closed roads. >> just a little -- a few customers coming in. >> reporter: the city says it is taking the necessary measures to find and fix the problems. so far, crews have used a camera underground to look at the engage -- damage. scan water mains and check the sewer drains to make sure they're intact. >> it will give us an indication of what needs to be done in order to make a correction. >> reporter: but some say that correction will be just another temporary fix for a permanent problem. >> they need another system. >> i don't see wh
in baltimore city. anne anne arundel count tip has 38,000. >>> we're across the state with rochelle richie but first up is adam may in townsend baltimore county which was hard hit like many other count tips. >> reporter: let me show you some of the problems we're dealing with. this road here, bologna avenue being shut down. if you look over here, there are more power lines down. they are dangling in this yard. if you come around this way there's a good sight for people in this neighborhood. tree trimmers showed up about an hour ago. they are cutting down this giant pine tree so they can make repairs to this power pole that snapped down in those high winds. just off court road. >> this was a wild and furious storm. >> reporter: sissorman's tree came down. >> this one took out that one, and all the way down. >> reporter: across baltimore county the sound of generators and chain saws echo through neighborhoods. >> everywhere we've been it's all the same. with branches down, trees down, trees on houses, trees on cars. >> reporter: jason has been working nonstop in the sweltering heat since sun
with the old and in with the new. the u.s. department of transportation is awarding the city of baltimore $40 million to build a new bus transit facility. wjz is live in east baltimore, michelle richie with more on how unemployment and the environment will be affected. michelle. >> reporter: in the next few years more than 700 jobs are expected to be created because of this project and it's also going to help the neighborhood. if busy bus transit building are still standing after 65 years never being renovated. but today that is all about to change. >> we're giving amdot $40 million. >> reporter: u.s. secretary of transportation ray lahood says the money is part of a $53 million project to replace the bus facility. >> this is the second largest amount awarded this year through the federal transit administration. >> reporter: $40 million will come from federal funding, $13 million from the state. the benefits range from the creation of jobs, reduction in noise and an increase in parking for those like roslin johnson who have to share the street with more than 300 transit employees. >> usually
: and they are making progress. the most outages right now are in baltimore county, followed by the city and anne arundel county. more than 7500 lines were reported down, from that storm on friday. reporting live, mike hellgren, wjz eyewitness news. >> okay, mike. thank you. >>> and our first warning weather coverage continues now with rochelle ritchie, who has more on the impact in cecil county. >> reporter: well, vic, the family is still waiting to see if their home can be saved. the evidence of their near death experience, still lies in their yard. >> reporter: he's only 6 years old. but benny dixon knows all too well the sound of fear. >> you can see how that was a big mess. >> reporter: dixon was seen friday night, when his parents burst into his room. snatching him and his little sister out of their bed. >> daddy said we had to go to another safe place. and we did. we went to the bathroom closet. >> reporter: his parents could hear the howling winds winds and winds and crackling trees. what happened next nearly killed them. >> my husband knew right away, a tree went through the house. >> re
. >>> a frightening problem on a major baltimore street. a growing sinkhole. hits another problem for the city's old infrastructure. wjz is live right now. mike hellgren takes a closer look at the solutions to this growing problem. mike? >> reporter: vic, it's going to take sometime before this street gets back to normal. normally, it would be filled with cars, but it's just a mess right now. and they brought in heavy equipment to try to fix the hole. >> reporter: from sky eye chopper 13, you can see how much the monument street sinkhole has expanded. on the left is what it looks like now. on the right is just after it opens last week. it's still not stable. so dangerous, crews can't imagine the exact size. >> it's quite a challenge for us to come up with a design. especially with the roadway. >> reporter: the sink hole is just blocks from johns hopkins hospital. this busy part of monument street between bradford and east monford streets will be closed for weeks. >> reporter: dpw brought in ground-penetrating radar to test other areas around the sinkhole and found no problem. but for many, it's stil
in baltimore city. >> like the others, they follow the same pattern. they tend to be older. all of them are over the age of 45. they're distributed around the state. >> reporter: the elderly and those with preexisting medical conditions are most vulnerable. and that message is getting out. >> if you do have somebody elderly in your family, you do need to check on them. especially if they don't have air conditioning. >> reporter: one step that could prevent the death toll from rising as we head into august. maryland has issued 12 heat advisories this summer already. meghan mccorkell, wjz eyewitness news. >> the city opened several cooling centers throughout the day today. and extended hours at public pools. remember, wjz 13 is always on. check in for first warning weather coverage. for updates on the forecast, live doppler radar any time, log onto wjz.com. >>> well, fresh off harsh criticism from their dur etcho storm response, bge is seeking rate increases. if approved by the public service commission, the transmission portion of your bill would increase by about 6.6%. gas transmission
report extreme heat contributed to the deaths of 23 people in maryland, baltimore city reporting more than any other jurisdiction. >> almost everyone of those heat related deaths have been people ages 65 and older, which is why health officials says the so important to check on elderly family members and neighbors. >> when we are over heated, our hearts have to work harder, our lungs have to work harder, and it is harder to catch up, and get to your normal baseline when we have extended days of heat. >> reporter: it is also a cruel summer for road crews working with hot asphalt. >> feels like you are in an oven coming from the top and bottom. >> reporter: they know the worst will be yet to come. >> a lot of hot days lately probably more to come, come august. >> reporter: that is for sure. it is going to get worse likely, later on this summer. local hospitals, report a spike in emergency room visits every time, the temperatures climb like this, so these guys back here in the pool have the right idea back to you in studio. >> you have earned an opportunity to get wet yourself cool off.
. >> reporter: like the fire department, baltimore city police are also working on a social media policy. they say no specific problems issue are behind that push. >> and both the police and fire departments are looking at what department negligence are the cities have done. as well as professional organizations to develop their new guidelines. reporting live downtown, mike hellgren, wjz eyewitness news. >> all right. thank you, mike. the department has no official deadline to put the social media policies into effect. >>> maryland firefighters rescue a dozen people. take a look at the scene. 17 people were trapped by the flame. and quickly rescued by firefighters. eventuallily, the fire went to three alarms. no one was injured. the fire caused $1.5 million in damage. >>> a new law trying to catch up to technology and the danger it poses on the road. maryland, it's now illegal to text while driving. alex demetrick reports, police are starting to enforce it. >> it's day one for a new patrol in anne arundel county. in a half dozen marked and unmarked units. the new target? >> trying to fin
the breaking news we first brought you last hour from northeast baltimore. captain jeff long is in sky chopper 13 above it with more for us, captain jeff. >> hartford road remains closed in both directions here at clear view avenue just outside of city limits. we have two work trucks here and then just to the north of them on hartford road a seriously damaged silver sedan. a driver of this sedan was put into an ambulance. we believe they are in ran ambulance that's still on the scene. a lot of bystanders here, there's a fifth vehicle. we're not sure this taxi is parked in a strange angle it's been here the whole time. we'll keep watching this. i'm captain jeff long, back to you. >> it is a bad accident, captain jeff. thank you. >>> the man accused of killing 12 people in a colorado movie theater is back in court. family members and victims looked on. edward lawrence has the latest for wjz from the courthouse. >> reporter: james holmes stared straight ahead as prosecutors charged him. >> 24 counts of murder in the first degree, 116 counts of criminal attempt to commit murder. >> reporter: the c
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22